1. Interactive Reading: A guided tour of an animal cell

[qwiz qrecord_id=”sciencemusicvideosMeister1961-Animal Cells (AP) I.R.”]

[h]Interactive Reading: A guided tour of an animal cell

[i]A general name for a cell part with a specific function is organelle. In what follows, we’ll review some key organelles, and see how they’re connected in a variety of systems. By the time you’re done with this reading and the quizzes that follow, you should be able to identify the name and function of each numbered part below.

[!]Question 1[/!]

[q]
We’ll start from the outside and work our way in. Number 2 is the cell membrane. Its function is to control what enters and leaves the cell.

Of the following choices, the one that best describes the job of the cell membrane would be a

[c]boss in a factory

[c]secretary in an office

[c*]gatekeeper at a stadium

[f]No. Think of a job that involves controlling who enters and who leaves.

[f]No. Think of a job that involves controlling who enters and who leaves.

[f]Yes. The cell membrane is like a gatekeeper, controlling who enters and who leaves.

[!]Question 2[/!]

[q]
Another key system inside the cell involves energy production. This system begins with the cytoplasm, which is at number 1. The cytoplasm is a gel-like liquid that holds the cells organelles, and it’s the site of many of the cell’s chemical reactions. One of the most important of these reactions is the breakdown of glucose (a simple sugar) to make ATP (the cell’s moment-to-moment energy source). This process begins with enzymes in the cytoplasm, then continues in number 7, the mitochondria.

If a cell were a city, the mitochondria would be like the

[c]sewage system

[c*]power plant

[c]reservoir (water storage)

[c]highway system

[f]No. What’s a system that seems to be connected to energy production?

[f]Yes. If a cell were a city, the mitochondria would be like a power plant.

[f]No. What’s a system that seems to be connected to energy production?

[f]No. What’s a system that seems to be connected to energy production?

[!]Question 3[/!]

[q]Production of useful energy in a cell begins in the ____________, and then continues in the mitochondria.

[hangman]

[c]cytoplasm

[f]That’s right. Production of useful energy in a cell begins in the cytoplasm, then continues in the mitochondria.

[!]Question 4[/!]

[q]The cell’s moment to moment energy source is

[c]glucose

[c*]ATP

[c]starch

[c]fatty acid

[f]No. Glucose is an important basic fuel for cells, but cells have to convert it into another molecule in order to perform work.

[f]Yes. The moment to moment energy source that cells use to power life is ATP.

[f]No. Starch is a long terms energy storage molecule for plants.

[f]No. Fatty acids are building blocks of lipids, and important energy sources. But they’re not what the cell uses for its moment to moment energy needs.

[!]Question 5[/!]

[q]
Here’s a cool fact about mitochondria. Each mitochondrion (singular of mitochondria) is practically a cell in its own right. Mitochondria can’t live independently, outside eukaryotic cells, but they have their own DNA, and they reproduce on their own, just like bacteria. It’s been proved that mitochondria are the descendants of once free-living prokaryotic cells that, billions of years ago, took up residence inside a larger cell. That partnership was the basis for all eukaryotic life (which includes, of course, humans like you and me).

Which number points to the mitochondria?

[textentry single_char=”true”]

[c*]7

[f]Excellent. The mitochondrion is at number 7

[c]*

[f]No. Find the part within the cell that looks like it’s  a little bacterial cell.

[!]Question 6[/!]

[q]
Another key system inside cells is the system for protein production. The cell’s protein factories are ribosomes, shown as tiny dots at number 6. Ribosomes receive chemical instructions from the nucleus (5). In response, they produce any protein that the cell needs.

If a cell were a business, the boss would be the

[hangman]

[c*]nucleus

[f]Excellent. If a cell were a business, the boss would be the nucleus.

[!]Question 7[/!]

[q]

Many ribosomes are embedded in a network of membrane-bound channels called the endoplasmic reticulum (E.R.), shown at number 9. The portion of the E.R. that contains ribosomes is called the rough E.R. Proteins that are made at the rough E.R. are usually destined for export from the cell, inclusion in the cell’s membrane, or enclosure within a lysosome (described below).

In the diagram above, ribosomes that are not embedded in the E.R. are shown at

[textentry single_char=”true”]

[c*]6

[f]Excellent. The ribosomes, the cell’s protein factories, are at 6.

[c]*

[f]No. The ribosomes, the cell’s protein factories, are at 6.

[!]Question 8[/!]

[q]
In the diagram at right, the rough endoplasmic reticulum is shown at

[textentry single_char=”true”]

[c*]9

[f]Excellent. The rough endoplasmic reticulum is shown at 9

[c]*

[f]No. The rough endoplasmic reticulum is shown just outside the nucleus, which which contains the “X” shaped chromosomes.

[!]Question 9[/!]

[q]
After proteins are released from the rough E.R., they usually proceed to the Golgi Apparatus, where they are modified before being sent to their final destination. The Golgi Apparatus is shown at number 3. If the cell were a city, the Golgi’s function would be most like the

[c*]Post office

[c]Power plant

[c]Mayor’s office

[f]Yes. A post office is where packaging, shipping and distribution occurs. That’s what the Golgi does to proteins it receives from the ER.

[f]No. The power plant analogy fits best with the mitochondria. Which part is involved with packaging, shipping, and distribution?

[f]No. The Mayor’s office fits best with the nucleus. Which part is involved with packaging, shipping, and distribution?

[!]Question 10[/!]

[q]
In the diagram at right, the Golgi apparatus is shown at

[textentry single_char=”true”]

[c*]3

[f]Excellent. The Golgi Apparatus is shown at 3.

[c]*

[f]No. The Golgi Apparatus looks like a series of flattened sacs. Which part looks like that?

[!]Question 11[/!]

[q]
Another key system involves storage of genetic information and control of the cell. This function falls to the nucleus, shown at 5. The nucleus is the storehouse of the cell’s genetic information. This information is encoded in DNA, the molecule of heredity. Within the nucleus, DNA is organized into chromosomes, shown at number 4.

If a cell were a city, the nucleus would be like the

[c]sewer system

[c]power plant

[c]post office

[c*]Mayor’s office

[f]No. Think of how the nucleus makes decisions controlling the rest of the cell. Who, in a city, does that?

[f]No. Think of how the nucleus makes decisions controlling the rest of the cell. Who, in a city, does that?

[f]No. Think of how the nucleus makes decisions controlling the rest of the cell. Who, in a city, does that?

[f]Yes. The nucleus is somewhat like the mayor’s office. In the same way that the mayor is the chief of the city, the nucleus is the chief of the cell.

[!]Question 12[/!]

[q]
In the diagram at right, the chromosomes are shown at

[textentry single_char=”true”]

[c*]4

[f]Excellent. The chromosomes are shown at 4

[c]*

[f]No. Chromosomes can be seen inside the nucleus, where they’re represented with an “X” like shape.

[!]Question 13[/!]

[q]
In the diagram at right, the nucleus is shown at

[textentry single_char=”true”]

[c*]5

[f]Excellent. The nucleus is shown at 5

[c]*

[f]No. To find the nucleus, start by finding the chromosomes which can be seen inside the nucleus. The chromosomes are represented with an “X” like shape.

[!]Question 14[/!]

[q]
Another key cell function is cell reproduction, also known at cell __________. When a cell divides, it has to replicate its chromosomes. The centriole, shown at number 8, produces a spindle of protein fibers that manipulate the _______________, ensuring that at the end of cell division, a full set of chromosomes winds up in each __________ cell.

[l]chromosomes

[fx] No. Please try again.

[f*] Excellent!

[l]daughter

[fx] No, that’s not correct. Please try again.

[f*] Correct!

[l]division

[fx] No. Please try again.

[f*] Correct!

[!]Question 15[/!]

[q]
The portion of the E.R. that doesn’t have ribosomes is called the smooth E.REnzymes in the smooth ER produce lipids, including phospholipids (which make up the cell membrane) and steroids.

Based on its description, the smooth ER must be at

[textentry suggest=”false”]

[c*]10

 

[f]Yes. The smooth ER is at 10.

[c]*

[f]No. Look for a part that’s just outside of the rough ER, but which lacks ribosomes.

[!]Question 15a (lysosomes and vacuoles) [/!]

[q]
The two following parts aren’t numbered (or even shown) in the diagram, but you should know their functions

  • Lysosomes are involved with intracellular digestion and recycling of worn-out cell parts. Lysosomes are only found in animal cells.  
  • Vacuoles are organelles used for temporary storage.

If a cell were a kitchen, the vacuoles would be like the

[c]blender

[c]oven

[c*]cabinets

[f]No.The function of the vacuoles is storage. Which part of a kitchen is involved with storage?

[f]No. The function of the vacuoles is storage. Which part of a kitchen is involved with storage?

[f]Yes. The function of the vacuoles is storage. That makes them somewhat like the kitchen cabinets.

[!]Question 16[/!]

[q]If a cell were a city, the lysosomes would be like the

[c]post office

[c]city park

[c]mayor’s office

[c*]recycling center

[f]No.A better analogy for the post office is the Golgi complex

[f]No.I can’t really think of a part of a cell that’s like a park…

[f]No. A better analogy for the Mayor’s office is the nucleus.

[f]Yes. Because the lysosomes breaks down worn out cell parts, making those parts available for reuse, a good analogy for it is the recycling center.

[/qwiz]

2. Cell parts and functions fill-in-the-blanks

[qwiz style=”width: 528px; border: 2px solid black; ” qrecord_id=”sciencemusicvideosMeister1961-Animal Cells (AP)FIB”]

[h] Cell Parts and Functions: Fill-in-the-Blanks

[i] This quiz plays like the game “hangman” but it’s also like a deck of flashcards.

[!]Card 1++++++++++++++++++[/!]

[q]A general name for a cell part with a specific function is [hangman]

[c]organelle

[f]Yes! A general name for a cell part with a specific function is organelle.

[!]Card 2++++++++++++++++++[/!]

[q]The part that surrounds the cytoplasm, and which controls what enters and leaves the cell is the cell [hangman]

[c]membrane

[f]Nice! The part that surrounds the cytoplasm, and which controls what enters and leaves the cell is the cell membrane.

[!]Card 3++++++++++++++++++[/!]

[q]The _____________ is a gel-like liquid that holds the cells organelles, and is the site of much cellular metabolism (chemical reactions).

[hangman]

[c]cytoplasm

[f]Awesome! The cytoplasm is a gel-like liquid that holds the cells organelles, and is the site of much cellular metabolism (chemical reactions).

[!]Card 4++++++++++++++++++[/!]

[q]The internal network of membrane-bound channels that is the site of manufacturing, warehousing, sorting, and shipping of proteins is the

[hangman]reticulum

[c]endoplasmic

[f]Nice! The internal network of membrane-bound channels that is the site of manufacturing, warehousing, sorting, and shipping of proteins is the endoplasmic reticulum

[!]Card 5++++++++++++++++++[/!]

[q]The internal network of membrane-bound channels that is studded with ribosomes is the [hangman] ER.

[c]rough

[f]Correct! The internal network of membrane-bound channels that is studded with ribosomes is the rough ER

[!]Card 6++++++++++++++++++[/!]

[q]The flattened, membrane-bound sacs that modify, package, and sort proteins it receives from the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) are known as the [hangman] apparatus

[c]Golgi

[f]Good Job! The flattened, membrane-bound sacs that modify, package, and sort proteins it receives from the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) are known as the Golgi apparatus (or “Golgi complex,” or “Golgi body.”

[!]Card 7++++++++++++++++++[/!]

[q]The cell parts that create proteins based on instructions they receive from the nucleus are the

[hangman]

[c]ribosomes

[f]Exactly! The cell parts that create proteins based on instructions they receive from the nucleus are the ribosomes.

[!]Card 8++++++++++++++++++[/!]

[q]The organelles used for temporary storage of materials in the cell are the

[hangman]

[c]vacuoles

[f]Terrific! The organelles used for temporary storage of materials in the cell are the vacuoles

[!]Card 9++++++++++++++++++[/!]

[q]_____________ are found only in animal cells. Their function is to digest food particles and to recycle worn-out cell parts.

[hangman]

[c]lysosomes

[f]Yes! Lysosomes are found only in animal cells. Their function is to digest food particles and to recycle worn-out cell parts.

[!]Card 10++++++++++++++++++[/!]

[q]The ________________contains the cell’s DNA, which is the genetic material of the cell. It’s surrounded by a membrane.

[hangman]

[c]nucleus

[f]Nice! The nucleus contains the cell’s DNA, which is the genetic material of the cell.  It’s surrounded by a membrane.

[!]Card 14++++++++++++++++++[/!]

[q]Within the nucleus, DNA is packaged into ________________

[hangman]

[c]chromosomes

[f]Excellent! Within the nucleus, DNA is packaged into chromosomes.

[!]Card 15++++++++++++++++++[/!]

[q]The ________________’s function is to separate chromosomes during cell division.

[hangman]

[c]centriole

[f]Way to Go! The centriole’s function is to separate chromosomes during cell division.

[!]Card 16++++++++++++++++++[/!]

[q]The ___________ , found in both plant and animal cells, convert sugars to ATP, the cell’s immediate energy source.

[hangman]

[c]mitochondria

[f]Good Job! The mitochondria , found in both plant and animal cells, convert sugars to ATP, the cell’s immediate energy source.

[!]Card 17++++++++++++++++++[/!]

[q]The ___________  ER is responsible for making lipids.

[hangman]

[c]smooth

[f]Nice! The smooth ER is responsible for making lipids (in addition to carrying out some other functions not discussed above).

[x]

If you want more practice, please press the restart button below.
[restart]
[/qwiz]

3. Animal Cells Parts Quiz

[qwiz qrecord_id=”sciencemusicvideosMeister1961-Animal Cells (AP)MC”]

[h] Animal  Cell Parts Quiz

[i]The following will test you on animal cell parts, and their functions.

[q labels = “top”]

 

[l]cell membrane

[fx] No, that’s not correct.  Please try again.

[f*] Excellent!

[l]centriole

[fx] No.  Please try again.

[f*] Excellent!

[l]chromosomes

[fx] No.  Please try again.

[f*] Good!

[l]cytoplasm

[fx] No.  Please try again.

[f*] Great!

[l]Rough ER

[fx] No.  Please try again.

[f*] Correct!

[l]Golgi apparatus

[fx] No.  Please try again.

[f*] Excellent!

[l]mitochondria

[fx] No, that’s not correct.  Please try again.

[f*] Great!

[l]nucleus

[fx] No, that’s not correct.  Please try again.

[f*] Excellent!

[l]ribosomes

[fx] No, that’s not correct.  Please try again.

[f*] Good!

[!] Question 1++++++++++++++[/!]

[q] In this diagram of an animal cell, which arrow is pointing to a centriole?

[c*] 8     [c] 9     [c] 3     [c] 4     [c] 7

[f] That’s correct! The centriole, which plays a major role in cell division, is at number 8.

[f] That’s not right. Number 9 is pointing to the E.R. (endoplasmic reticulum). Next time. look for the two perpendicular bundles of microtubules that represent the centriole.

[f] No. Number 3 is pointing to the Golgi apparatus. Next time. look for the two perpendicular bundles of microtubules that represent the centriole.

[f] That’s not correct. Number 4 is pointing to a chromosome. Next time. look for the two perpendicular bundles of microtubules that represent the centriole.

[f] No. Number 7 is pointing to a mitochondrion. Next time. look for the two perpendicular bundles of microtubules that represent the centriole.

[!] Question 2++++++++++++++[/!]

[q] In this diagram of an animal cell, which arrow is pointing to the nucleus?

[c] 7     [c] 8     [c] 9     [c*] 5     [c] 6

[f] No. Number 7 is pointing to a mitochondrion. In this diagram, the nucleus is represented as a sphere in the center of the cell.

[f] Incorrect. 8 is pointing to a centriole.  In this diagram, the nucleus is represented as a sphere in the center of the cell.

[f] No. Number 9 is pointing to the E.R. (endoplasmic reticulum). In this diagram, the nucleus is represented as a sphere in the center of the cell.

[f] Terrific! Number 5 is pointing to the nucleus, the cell’s control center.

[f] No. Number 6 is pointing to a group of ribosomes floating in the cell’s cytoplasm.

[!] Question 3++++++++++++++[/!]

[q] In this diagram of an animal cell, which arrow is pointing to the Golgi apparatus

[c] 2     [c*] 3     [c] 5     [c] 7     [c] 8

[f] No. 2 is pointing to the cell membrane. To find the Golgi apparatus, look for a stack of flattened sacs in-between the E.R. and the membrane.

[f] Excellent! 3 is pointing to the Golgi apparatus, which you correctly identified as being in-between the E.R. and the membrane. The Golgi acts as the cell’s packaging and sorting center.

[f] No. Number 5 is pointing to the nucleus, the cell’s control center. To find the Golgi apparatus, look for a stack of flattened sacs in-between the E.R. and the membrane.

[f] No. Number 7 is pointing to a mitochondrion, the cell’s energy factory. To find the Golgi apparatus, look for a stack of flattened sacs in-between the E.R. and the membrane.

[f] No. Number 8 is pointing to the centriole, which plays a key role in cell division. To find the Golgi apparatus, look for a stack of flattened sacs in-between the E.R. and the membrane.

[!] Question 4++++++++++++++[/!]

[q] In this diagram of an animal cell, which arrow is pointing to the rough endoplasmic reticulum (E.R.)?

[c] 5     [c] 7     [c] 8     [c*] 9     [c] 3

[f] No. Number 5 is pointing to the nucleus. To find the E.R., look for a thin and wavy network of membrane just outside of the nucleus.

[f] That’s not right. Number 7 is pointing to a mitochondrion. To find the E.R., look for a thin and wavy network of membrane just outside of the nucleus.

[f] No. Number 8 is pointing to a centriole. To find the E.R., look for a thin and wavy network of membrane just outside of the nucleus.

[f] Nice job! The E.R., is a thin and wavy network of membrane just outside of the nucleus.

[f] No. Number 3 is pointing to the Golgi apparatus. To find the E.R., look for a thin and wavy network of membrane just outside of the nucleus.

[!] Question 5++++++++++++++[/!]

[q] In this diagram of an animal cell, which arrow is pointing to the cytoplasm?

[c*] 1     [c] 2     [c] 3     [c] 4     [c] 5

[f] Exactly. Number 1 is pointing to the cytoplasm, which consists of everything inside the membrane.

[f] No. 2 is pointing to the cell membrane, the outer boundary of the cell. The cytoplasm is everything inside the membrane.

[f] No. Number 3 is pointing to the Golgi body (also called the Golgi apparatus or Golgi complex). The cytoplasm is everything inside the membrane.

[f] No. Number 4 is pointing to a chromosome. The cytoplasm is everything inside the membrane.

[f] No. Number 5 is pointing to the nucleus. The cytoplasm is everything inside the membrane.

[!] Question 6++++++++++++++[/!]

[q] In this diagram of an animal cell, which arrow is pointing to a mitochondrion?

[c] 5     [c*] 7     [c] 8     [c] 9     [c] 3

[f] No. Number 5 is pointing to the nucleus. To find the mitochondrion, look for an organelle that looks like a small bacterial cell (which in many ways, is what mitochondria are).

[f] Awesome! Number 7 is pointing to a mitochondrion. The mitochondria function as the cell’s power plants. If they look to you like little cells, that’s because they once were independent cells. This is the theory of endosymbiosis, developed by Lynn Margulis and now widely accepted.

[f] That’s not right. Number 8 is pointing to a centriole. To find the mitochondrion, look for an organelle that looks like a small bacterial cell (which in many ways, is what mitochondria are).

[f] No. Number 9 is pointing to the endoplasmic reticulum. To find the mitochondrion, look for an organelle that looks like a small bacterial cell (which in many ways, is what mitochondria are).

[f] No. Number 3 is pointing to the Golgi apparatus. To find the mitochondrion, look for an organelle that looks like a small bacterial cell (which in many ways, is what mitochondria are).

[!] Question 7++++++++++++++[/!]

[q] In this diagram of an animal cell, which arrow is pointing to the membrane?

[c] 1     [c*] 2     [c] 3     [c] 4     [c] 5

[f] That’s not right. Number 1 is pointing to the cytoplasm. The cell membrane is the outer boundary of an animal cell. Next time, click on something that could be the outer boundary.

[f] Correct. Number 2 is pointing to the cell’s membrane.

[f] No. Number 3 is pointing to the Golgi body (also called the Golgi apparatus or Golgi complex). The cell membrane is the outer boundary of an animal cell. Next time, click on something that could be the outer boundary.

[f] No. Number 4 is pointing to a chromosome. The cell membrane is the outer boundary of an animal cell. Next time, click on something that could be the outer boundary.

[f] No. Number 5 is pointing to the nucleus. The cell membrane is the outer boundary of an animal cell. Next time, click on something that could be the outer boundary.

[!] Question 8++++++++++++++[/!]

[q] In this diagram of an animal cell, which arrow is pointing to a group of ribosomes floating in the cytoplasm?

[c] 3     [c] 5     [c*] 6     [c] 8     [c] 9

[f] No. Number 3 is pointing to the Golgi apparatus. In this diagram, the ribosomes are represented as a group of black dots floating around in the cytoplasm.

[f] Incorrect. Number 5 is pointing to the nucleus.  In this diagram, the ribosomes are represented as a group of black dots floating around in the cytoplasm.

[f] Fabulous! The ribosomes, which are the cell’s protein factories, are shown at number 6.

[f] No. Number 8 is pointing to a centriole. In this diagram, the ribosomes are represented as a group of black dots floating around in the cytoplasm.

[f] No, but that’s a very good answer. 9 is pointing to the endoplasmic reticulum. The endoplasmic reticulum is, in fact, studded with ribosomes…but they’re not floating freely in the cytoplasm. Look for a group of black dots floating around in the cytoplasm.

[!] Question 9++++++++++++++[/!]

[q] In this diagram of an animal cell, which arrow is pointing to a chromosome?

[c] 8     [c] 9     [c] 1     [c] 3     [c*] 4

[f] No. Number 8 is pointing to a centriole. To find the chromosomes, look inside the nucleus, in the centermost part of the cell.

[f] Incorrect. Number 9 is pointing to the E.R. (endoplasmic reticulum). To find the chromosomes, look inside the nucleus, in the centermost part of the cell.

[f] No. Number 1 is pointing to the cytoplasm. To find the chromosomes, look inside the nucleus, in the centermost part of the cell.

[f] No. Number 3 is pointing to the Golgi apparatus. To find the chromosomes, look inside the nucleus, in the centermost part of the cell.

[f] Perfect!. Number 4 is pointing to a chromosome, which is located inside the nucleus. Chromosomes are primarily composed of DNA, and store the cell’s genetic material.

[!] Question 1++++++++++++++[/!]

[q] In the animal cell diagram shown below, which part is pointing to the cell’s control center?

[c*] 5     [c] 7     [c] 8     [c] 9     [c] 3

[f] Perfect! Number 5 is pointing to the nucleus, the cell’s control center.

[f] No. Number 7 is pointing to the mitochondria, the cell’s energy factory. The answer to this question lies in the center of the cell, in the organelle that contains the cell’s chromosomes.

[f] Incorrect.  Number 8 is pointing to the centrioles, which play a key role during cell division. The answer to this question lies in the center of the cell, in the organelle that contains the cell’s chromosomes.

[f] No. Number 9 is pointing to the endoplasmic reticulum, which plays a key role in creating proteins for export. The answer to this question lies in the center of the cell, in the organelle that contains the cell’s chromosomes.

[f] Not quite. Number 3 is pointing to the Golgi apparatus, which packages and modifies the proteins it receives from E.R. The answer to this question lies in the center of the cell, in the organelle that contains the cell’s chromosomes.

[!] Question 2++++++++++++++[/!]

[q] In the animal cell diagram shown below, which part is pointing to a part that stores hereditary information?

[c] 1     [c] 3     [c*] 4     [c] 7     [c] 8

[f] That’s not right. Number 1 is pointing to the cytoplasm. The answer to this question is inside the nucleus, in the center of the cell.

[f] No. Number 3 is pointing to the Golgi complex, the cell’s packaging and sorting center. The answer to this question is inside the nucleus, in the center of the cell.

[f] Fabulous.  Number 4 is pointing to the chromosomes, which store the cell’s hereditary information.

[f] No. Number 7 is pointing to a mitochondrion, one of the cell’s energy factories. The answer to this question is inside the nucleus, in the center of the cell.

[f] Not quite. Number 8 is pointing to the centrioles, which play a key role in cell division. The answer to this question is inside the nucleus, in the center of the cell.

[!] Question 3++++++++++++++[/!]

[q] In the animal cell diagram shown below, which part is pointing to the cell’s protein factories?

[c] 4     [c*] 6     [c] 7     [c] 8     [c] 2

[f] That’s not right. Number 4 is pointing to the chromosomes, which store genetic information. The protein factories that you’re looking for are in the cytoplasm and on the rough E.R. and they’re much smaller than the other organelles in the cell.

[f] Fabulous!. Number 6 is pointing to the ribosomes.

[f] Incorrect.  Number 7 is pointing to a mitochondrion. Mitochondria function as the cell’s energy factories. The protein factories that you’re looking for are in the cytoplasm and on the rough E.R. and they’re much smaller than the other organelles in the cell.

[f] No. Number 8 is pointing to the centriole, which plays a key role during cell division. The protein factories that you’re looking for are in the cytoplasm and on the rough E.R. and they’re much smaller than the other organelles in the cell.

[f] Not quite. Number 2 is pointing to the cell membrane, which controls what enters and leaves the cell. The protein factories that you’re looking for are in the cytoplasm and on the rough E.R. and they’re much smaller than the other organelles in the cell.

[!] Question 4++++++++++++++[/!]

[q] In the animal cell diagram shown below, which part is pointing to the part that creates proteins for export, or for inclusion in lysosomes?

[c] 3     [c] 5     [c] 7     [c] 8     [c*] 9

[f] Not quite. Number 3 is pointing to the Golgi apparatus, which packages and modifies the proteins it receives from endoplasmic reticulum (E.R). You’re looking for a network of internal membranes, the inner part of which is studded with ribosomes.

[f] Incorrect. Number 5 is pointing to the nucleus, the cell’s control center. You’re looking for a network of internal membranes, the inner part of which is studded with ribosomes.

[f] No. Number 7 is pointing to the mitochondria, the cell’s energy factory. You’re looking for a network of internal membranes, the inner part of which is studded with ribosomes.

[f] Incorrect. Number 8 is pointing to the centrioles, which play a key role during cell division. You’re looking for a network of internal membranes, the inner part of which is studded with ribosomes.

[f] That’s correct! Number 9 is pointing to the endoplasmic reticulum, or E.R. The E.R. has two regions: the rough E.R. is studded with ribosomes, and produces proteins for inclusion in lysosomes, or for export from the cell. The smooth E.R. lacks ribosomes, and is involved in lipid synthesis.

[!] Question 5++++++++++++++[/!]

[q] In the animal cell diagram shown below, which part is pointing to one of the cell’s “energy factories,” the job of which is to create ATP (the cell’s immediate energy source)?

[c] 2     [c] 3     [c] 5     [c*] 7     [c] 9

[f] That’s not right. Number 2 is pointing to the cell membrane, which controls what enters and leaves the cell. Next time you see this question, look for a number that is pointing to an organelle that looks like a small bacterial cell.

[f] No. Number 3 is pointing to the Golgi apparatus, which packages and modifies the proteins it receives from E.R.  Next time you see this question, look for a number that is pointing to an organelle that looks like a small bacterial cell.

[f] Incorrect. Number 5 is pointing to the nucleus, the cell’s control center. Next time you see this question, look for a number that is pointing to an organelle that looks like a small bacterial cell.

[f] Nice Job! Number 7 is pointing to a mitochondrion. The mitochondria serve as the cell’s energy factories. If you think that they look like small bacterial cells, that’s exactly right. Essentially, mitochondria are bacterial cells that live inside eukaryotic cells, and have been doing so for over a billion years. If you’re interested, research Lynn Margulis and the endosymbiotic hypothesis to learn more about this (you can follow the link at the end of this quiz).

[f] Not quite. Number 9 is pointing to the endoplasmic reticulum, which plays a key role in creating proteins for export. Next time you see this question, look for a number that is pointing to an organelle that looks like a small bacterial cell.

[!] Question 6++++++++++++++[/!]

[q] In the animal cell diagram shown below, which part is pointing to the part that creates the spindle, the structure that separates chromosomes during cell division?

[c] 5     [c] 7     [c*] 8     [c] 9     [c] 3

[f] Incorrect. Number 5 is pointing to the nucleus, the cell’s control center. Next time you see this question, look for the centrioles, which look like two perpendicular arrays of protein fibers.

[f] No. Number 7 is pointing to the mitochondria, the cell’s energy factory. Next time you see this question, look for the centrioles, which look like two perpendicular arrays of protein fibers.

[f] Awesome! Number 8 is pointing to the centrioles.

[f] Incorrect. Number 9 is pointing to the endoplasmic reticulum, which plays a key role in creating proteins for export. Next time you see this question, look for the centrioles, which look like two perpendicular arrays of protein fibers.

[f] Not quite. Number 3 is pointing to the Golgi apparatus, which packages and modifies the proteins it receives from E.R. Next time you see this question, look for the centrioles, which look like two perpendicular arrays of protein fibers.

[!] Question 7++++++++++++++[/!]

[q] In the animal cell diagram shown below, which part is pointing to the selectively permeable barrier that controls what enters and leaves the cell?

[c] 1     [c*] 2     [c] 5     [c] 7     [c] 9

[f] That’s not right. Number 1 is pointing to the cell’s cytoplasm, the primary site for the cell’s metabolic reactions. The part that controls what enters and leaves the cell has to be on the outside, so next time, select one of the outermost parts.

[f] Terrific! Number 2 is pointing to the cell’s membrane, which is the selectively permeable barrier that controls what enters and leaves the cell.

[f] That’s incorrect. Number 5 is pointing to the nucleus, the cell’s control center. The part that controls what enters and leaves the cell has to be on the outside, so next time, select one of the outermost parts.

[f] No. Number 7 is pointing to a mitochondrion, one of the cell’s energy factories. The part that controls what enters and leaves the cell has to be on the outside, so next time, select one of the outermost parts.

[f] Not correct. Number 9 is pointing to the endoplasmic reticulum. While the endoplasmic is, essentially, an internal membrane system, it’s not the membrane that’s controlling what enters and leaves the cell. The part that controls what enters and leaves the cell has to be on the outside, so next time, select one of the outermost parts.

[!] Question 8++++++++++++++[/!]

[q] In the animal cell diagram shown below, which part is pointing to the part that is the site of most of the cell’s metabolism (chemical reactions)?

[c] 3     [c] 4     [c] 7     [c*] 1     [c] 2

[f] That’s not right. Number 3 is pointing to the Golgi apparatus, the function of which is to package and sort the proteins it receives from the endoplasmic reticulum. Most of the cell’s chemical reactions occur in the clear fluid between the membrane and the nucleus. What part is that?

[f] Incorrect. Number 4 is pointing to a chromosome. Chromosomes store hereditary information. Most of the cell’s chemical reactions occur in the clear fluid between the membrane and the nucleus. What part is that?

[f] That’s incorrect. Number 7 points to a mitochondrion, which serves as the cell’s energy factory. Most of the cell’s chemical reactions occur in the clear fluid between the membrane and the nucleus. What part is that?

[f] Excellent. Number 1 is pointing to the cell’s cytoplasm, which is where many of the cell’s chemical reactions occur.

[f] Not correct. Number 2 is pointing to the cell membrane, which controls what enters and leaves the cell. Most of the cell’s chemical reactions occur in the clear fluid between the membrane and the nucleus. What part is that?

[!] Question 9++++++++++++++[/!]

[q] In the animal cell diagram shown below, which part is pointing to the organelle that packages and sorts proteins?

[c] 5     [c] 7     [c] 8     [c] 9     [c*] 3

[f] That’s not right. Number 5 is pointing to the cell’s nucleus. Next time you see this question, select the arrow pointing to what looks like a stack of flattened sacs in-between the E.R. and the cell membrane.

[f] No. Number 7 is pointing to a mitochondrion, one of the cell’s energy factories. Next time you see this question, select the arrow pointing to what looks like a stack of flattened sacs in-between the E.R. and the cell membrane.

[f] That’s incorrect. Number 8 is pointing to the centriole, which plays a major role in separating the chromosomes during cell division. Next time you see this question, select the arrow pointing to what looks like a stack of flattened sacs in-between the E.R. and the cell membrane.

[f] No. Number 9 is pointing to the endoplasmic reticulum, which creates proteins for export, or for incorporation into a lysosome. Next time you see this question, select the arrow pointing to what looks like a stack of flattened sacs in-between the E.R. and the cell membrane.

[f] Exactly! Number 3 is the Golgi complex, which receives proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum, and then packages and sorts them for shipping to the membrane (for export), or to a lysosome.

[!] Question 10++++++++++++++[/!]

[q] In the animal cell diagram shown below, which part is pointing to the organelle that synthesizes (chemically creates) lipids?

[c] 5     [c] 7     [c] 8     [c] 9     [c*] 10

[f] That’s not right. Number 5 is pointing to the cell’s nucleus. Next time you see this question, select the arrow pointing to ER that doesn’t have ribosomes.

[f] No. Number 7 is pointing to a mitochondrion, one of the cell’s energy factories.Next time you see this question, select the arrow pointing to ER that doesn’t have ribosomes.

[f] That’s incorrect. Number 8 is pointing to the centriole, which plays a major role in separating the chromosomes during cell division.Next time you see this question, select the arrow pointing to ER that doesn’t have ribosomes. 

[f] No. Number 9 is pointing to the endoplasmic reticulum, which creates proteins for export, or for incorporation into a lysosome. Next time you see this question, select the arrow pointing to ER that doesn’t have ribosomes.

[f] Exactly! Number 10 is the smooth ER, which (among its other functions) synthesizes lipids (such as phospholipids and steroids).

[x]
If you want to take this quiz again, click the button below. To learn about Lynn Margolis and the endosymbiotic theory, click here.

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